Video Transcript: DAISY Makes Reading Easier

YouTube Video: DAISY Makes Reading Easier (English)

 

Narrator:

Worldwide there are as many as 200 million people with disabilities that experience difficulty or are prevented from reading printed books, magazines and newspapers.

Hugh Huddy:

“I have retinal dystrophy which is a medical way of saying that the retinal cells which collect light are very grudgingly deteriorating. I was brought up in a family of readers in a house that was full of books, books for me, they symbolize home, and they symbolize learning. The single biggest change for me came when I could no longer read the average print size.

Madeline Mann:

“I do enjoy reading books a lot. I like family sagas, I like books about different countries and cultures but I don’t have a great choice, I really have to read whatever I can get my hands on.”

Corne Kremers:

“I was born with a disease that caused me to gradually loose my eyesight; I have been blind for nearly 15 years. I like to read detective books and there are some Dutch authors who write very good detective novels but even though there are about 20,000 books published in the Netherlands each year only 10% of these books have been published for the reading impaired.”

Narrator:

The vision of the Digital Accessible Information System or DAISY Consortium is that all published information be available to people who are blind or print disabled at the time of publication. In addition, the published information must be available in a highly functional feature rich format at the same as price as the printed version.

Hugh Huddy:

“I want to read new material, material about modern life, about today’s debates and today’s discussions and the big problem for me is those books come out in print.  It’s a matter of years until if they ever get into a DAISY book format.”

Narrator:

The shortage of DAISY books and other content may soon be a thing of the past.  A collaborative project between the DAISY Consortium, Microsoft and Sonata has the power to transform millions of open XML documents into the DAISY format.  A free plug-in into Microsoft word allows any open XML document to be saved as DAISY.

Hugh Huddy:

“I can’t imagine now that there is not a single book that has not been typed into a word processor when it was first authored.”

Corne Kremers:

“If the publishers use the Save As Daisy feature to provide us titles from the original electronic copy of the book we will be able to provide the accessible version much faster and just as importantly, make more titles available.”

Hugh Huddy:

“It’s a matter of preserving what was there right in the beginning of the book’s life, when the author was creating it electronically, It’s not asking for anything special.”

Narrator:

DAISY books created from open XML documents using the Save As Daisy plug in and Microsoft Office, allow the same navigational flexibility that sighted persons use when reading.

Hugh Huddy:

“In London we have tactile pavement that has these bumps in it, and I know that is my crossing point, it’s crucial. It’s the way the city is labeled.  There really isn’t anything different in the physical environment, as to a DAISY book. How do I know where that road crossing is? We can see navigation points in DAISY.”

Madeline Mann:

“The Save As DAISY feature in Microsoft Word is really a big advantage. If a DAISY book is really nicely structured we can jump from bookmark to bookmark, chapter to chapter, that is just amazing, we can just do like a sighted person does.”

Corne Kremers:

“It’s very important that we can read what we want. When a book is in DAISY it doesn’t matter.”

Hugh Huddy:

“We can read the same books as people who aren’t visually impaired. Technology, when it evolves around people's actual needs rather than the needs of the designer, that’s when it stands to work.”